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Programming In Lua

Chapters Checklist

  • Part I The Language
  • 1 – Getting Started
    • 1.1 – Chunks
    • 1.2 – Global Variables
    • 1.3 – Some Lexical Conventions
    • 1.4 – The Stand-Alone Interpreter
  • 2 – Types and Values
    • 2.1 – Nil
    • 2.2 – Booleans
    • 2.3 – Numbers
    • 2.4 – Strings
    • 2.5 – Tables
    • 2.6 – Functions
    • 2.7 – Userdata and Threads
  • 3 – Expressions
    • 3.1 – Arithmetic Operators
    • 3.2 – Relational Operators
    • 3.3 – Logical Operators
    • 3.4 – Concatenation
    • 3.5 – Precedence
    • 3.6 – Table Constructors
  • 4 – Statements
    • 4.1 – Assignment
    • 4.2 – Local Variables and Blocks
    • 4.3 – Control Structures
    • 4.3.1 – if then else
    • 4.3.2 – while
    • 4.3.3 – repeat
    • 4.3.4 – Numeric for
    • 4.3.5 – Generic for
    • 4.4 – break and return
  • 5 – Functions
    • 5.1 – Multiple Results
    • 5.2 – Variable Number of Arguments
    • 5.3 – Named Arguments
  • 6 – More about Functions
    • 6.1 – Closures
    • 6.2 – Non-Global Functions
    • 6.3 – Proper Tail Calls
  • 7 – Iterators and the Generic for
    • 7.1 – Iterators and Closures
    • 7.2 – The Semantics of the Generic for
    • 7.3 – Stateless Iterators
    • 7.4 – Iterators with Complex State
    • 7.5 – True Iterators
  • 8 – Compilation, Execution, and Errors
    • 8.1 – The require Function
    • 8.2 – C Packages
    • 8.3 – Errors
    • 8.4 – Error Handling and Exceptions
    • 8.5 – Error Messages and Tracebacks
  • 9 – Coroutines
    • 9.1 – Coroutine Basics
    • 9.2 – Pipes and Filters
    • 9.3 – Coroutines as Iterators
    • 9.4 – Non-Preemptive Multithreading
  • 10 – Complete Examples
    • 10.1 – Data Description
    • 10.2 – Markov Chain Algorithm
  • Part II Tables and Objects
  • 11 – Data Structures
    • 11.1 – Arrays
    • 11.2 – Matrices and Multi-Dimensional Arrays
    • 11.3 – Linked Lists
    • 11.4 – Queues and Double Queues
    • 11.5 – Sets and Bags
    • 11.6 – String Buffers
  • 12 – Data Files and Persistence
    • 12.1 – Serialization
    • 12.1.1 – Saving Tables without Cycles
    • 12.1.2 – Saving Tables with Cycles
  • 13 – Metatables and Metamethods
    • 13.1 – Arithmetic Metamethods
    • 13.2 – Relational Metamethods
    • 13.3 – Library-Defined Metamethods
    • 13.4 – Table-Access Metamethods
    • 13.4.1 – The __index Metamethod
    • 13.4.2 – The __newindex Metamethod
    • 13.4.3 – Tables with Default Values
    • 13.4.4 – Tracking Table Accesses
    • 13.4.5 – Read-Only Tables
  • 14 – The Environment
    • 14.1 – Accessing Global Variables with Dynamic Names
    • 14.2 – Declaring Global Variables
    • 14.3 – Non-Global Environments
  • 15 – Packages
    • 15.1 – The Basic Approach
    • 15.2 – Privacy
    • 15.3 – Packages and Files
    • 15.4 – Using the Global Table
    • 15.5 – Other Facilities
  • 16 – Object-Oriented Programming
    • 16.1 – Classes
    • 16.2 – Inheritance
    • 16.3 – Multiple Inheritance
    • 16.4 – Privacy
    • 16.5 – The Single-Method Approach
  • 17 – Weak Tables
    • 17.1 – Memoize Functions
    • 17.2 – Object Attributes
    • 17.3 – Revisiting Tables with Default Values
  • Part III · The Standard Libraries
  • 18 – The Mathematical Library
  • 19 – The Table Library
    • 19.1 – Array Size
    • 19.2 – Insert and Remove
    • 19.3 – Sort
  • 20 – The String Library
    • 20.1 – Pattern-Matching Functions
    • 20.2 – Patterns
    • 20.3 – Captures
    • 20.4 – Tricks of the Trade
  • 21 – The I/O Library
    • 21.1 – The Simple I/O Model
    • 21.2 – The Complete I/O Model
    • 21.2.1 – A Small Performance Trick
    • 21.2.2 – Binary Files
    • 21.3 – Other Operations on Files
  • 22 – The Operating System Library
    • 22.1 – Date and Time
    • 22.2 – Other System Calls
  • 23 – The Debug Library
    • 23.1 – Introspective Facilities
    • 23.1.1 – Accessing Local Variables
    • 23.1.2 – Accessing Upvalues
    • 23.2 – Hooks
    • 23.3 – Profiles
  • Part IV · The C API
  • 24 – An Overview of the C API
    • 24.1 – A First Example
    • 24.2 – The Stack
    • 24.2.1 – Pushing Elements
    • 24.2.2 – Querying Elements
    • 24.2.3 – Other Stack Operations
    • 24.3 – Error Handling with the C API
    • 24.3.1 – Error Handling in Application Code
    • 24.3.2 – Error Handling in Library Code
  • 25 – Extending your Application
    • 25.1 – Table Manipulation
    • 25.2 – Calling Lua Functions
    • 25.3 – A Generic Call Function
  • 26 – Calling C from Lua
    • 26.1 – C Functions
    • 26.2 – C Libraries
  • 27 – Techniques for Writing C Functions
    • 27.1 – Array Manipulation
    • 27.2 – String Manipulation
    • 27.3 – Storing State in C Functions
    • 27.3.1 – The Registry
    • 27.3.2 – References
    • 27.3.3 – Upvalues
  • 28 – User-Defined Types in C
    • 28.1 – Userdata
    • 28.2 – Metatables
    • 28.3 – Object-Oriented Access
    • 28.4 – Array Access
    • 28.5 – Light Userdata
  • 29 – Managing Resources
    • 29.1 – A Directory Iterator
    • 29.2 – An XML Parser